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Cirrus autonomous return to home button

kd9ron

New member
I watched a video of a Cirrus jet with an emergency return to home button... sort of like a drone. The video and its claims are impressive.
My question is how well this system works after the landing.

I can see how the existing navigation systems can get the airplane to the field but at some point you are below the level of the signals.
How does this aircraft stay on the centerline?

My other concern is with all the controls being fed to servos for automatic control, isn't there a danger that the automatic system gets
jammed up and eliminates the possibility of sweaty hands on the yoke getting the job done?
 

Zeede

Active member
This system is for emergencies where there are no qualified pilots on board anymore who are in any condition to fly the airplane. Since there is an emergency, once the plane is on the runway it will just stop and emergency services would take over.

As for staying on centerline, being at a low altitude doesn't affect GPS signals, so that would be my guess.

As for the sweaty hands comment, again, the system is for emergencies when there's nobody left who could land the plane. I imagine there's some sort of over ride switch.
 

kd9ron

New member
Here is a link to one of their videos. Vision Jet Safe Return

I realize its intent. I would have a hard time sitting there doing nothing trusting the jet to land safely.

Your answer Zeede implies that the system is entirely GPS based. I'm not challenging you on this, but rather trying to learn what the current capabilites are for autoland systems. The big jets seem to have that capability, albeit the Captain is running the controls and can take over at any time. My point of reference is much smaller, cheaper and less capable systems. By way of example, my boat uses GPS for the autopilot and is hard pressed to stay in the middle of a river.
 

Plague

Active member
trusting the jet to land safely.
In the situation it's intended to cover this could be defined as "No serious injuries."
Centreline? ... Hell, the grass is fine.

It is probably better than that, but don't let perfect be the enemy of good in an emergency.
 

Zeede

Active member
I realize its intent. I would have a hard time sitting there doing nothing trusting the jet to land safely.
That makes two of us. However, as my wife pointed out, trusting the Safe Return system to land the Vision Jet would be preferable to having one of our teenagers try and land it :D (assuming that I had gotten incapacitated somehow)

Your answer Zeede implies that the system is entirely GPS based. I'm not challenging you on this, but rather trying to learn what the current capabilites are for autoland systems. The big jets seem to have that capability, albeit the Captain is running the controls and can take over at any time. My point of reference is much smaller, cheaper and less capable systems. By way of example, my boat uses GPS for the autopilot and is hard pressed to stay in the middle of a river.
I don't know the technical specs, but I would be surprised if it wasn't entirely GPS based. As Plague mentioned, the criteria is for the landing to be survivable. It doesn't have to be pretty.

Btw, the reason your boat GPS can't stay in the middle of the river is probably because it isn't a WAAS GPS. Those will know your location within a foot or two, and are extremely accurate.
 

321Captain

Member
When I fly a Cat IIIB approach in the A321, you have to disconnect the autopilot so that you can get Off the centerline of the runway.
 

Waterbird27

New member
Doesn't the Vision Jet also have a full frame parachute? That system is well-tested. Return to home, pop the chute?
 
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